Category: Embodied Leadership

Stop Accepting the Unacceptable and Create a Community Committed to Change

Community committed to changeNothing ruins my day more than an encounter with someone who says, “Well, it’s been like that for as long as I’ve been here and there’s nothing anyone can do to change it.” If you hear that enough times, you begin to doubt whether change is even possible. It makes me sad to see leaders and teams fall into this pattern of disempowering acceptance. 

It’s when you feel isolated and alone with a problem that you can find yourself accepting the unacceptable. This brings me back to Margaret Wheatley’s poem, “Turning to One Another.” (To read the entire poem take a look at a previous blog.) I’ve been reflecting on this poem over the last few weeks and this next stanza I find particularly motivating when confronted with the unacceptable.

Invite in everybody who cares to work on what’s possible. 

Acknowledge that everyone is an expert about something. 

Know that creative solutions come from new connections.

I love this part of the poem. I want to work with others who care to work on what’s possible. Margaret Wheatley reminds us that each person holds expertise and, collectively, we can come up with new solutions. That’s my vibe, I’m all about collaboration and the synergy of the group that spins one idea off of another until they land on a common direction. It’s powerful.

If you’re a leader, and you’ve observed an unacceptable situation, what should you do next? 

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Embodied Leadership—The Key To Lasting Change for You and Your Team

A young women practicing embodied leadership.As a leader, you have to be willing to change and adapt. If you resist change, your team will follow your lead and will quickly flounder. Most organizations recognize this, which is why they invest millions of dollars on training leaders. Yet, according to an article on the Harvard Business Review, studies show a 60-70% failure rate for organizational change projects.

Organizational change is so difficult because there is a huge chasm between knowing you need to make a change and being able to actually implement it. For example, perhaps you know you need to be a clearer communicator, but you get in a hurry and your quickly-drafted-email confounds your assistant once again! Or how many times have we read about the importance of exercise or healthful eating, yet it doesn’t seem to translate into action? There is a disconnect between our understanding of the ways in which a changed behavior could be beneficial and its actual implementation.

If you’re like me, a 60-70% failure rate is simply unacceptable. The ability to follow through with a change, or a challenge, is a vital skill that all leaders need. I’ve recently discovered an approach that can bridge the gap between knowledge and action—embodied leadership.

My Discovery—A Lifelong Friend and a New Approach to Leadership

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Louise J Santiago, PhD
Executive Coach and Organizational Consultant

Where Leadership is Intentional Work

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